Founders

jragepF. Jamil Ragep is Canada Research Chair in the History of Science at the Institute of Islamic Studies, McGill University. Educated at the University of Michigan and Harvard University, he has written extensively on the history of astronomy, on science in Islam, on science and religion, and on the intercultural transmission of science. He is currently leading an international effort to catalogue all Islamic manuscripts in the exact sciences and is co-directing a project to study the fifteenth-century background to the Copernican revolution.

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Asghar

Anila Asghar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University. Prior to joining McGill she was an Assitant Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Education.  Her research focuses on the complex interactions among Islam, modern science, culture, and education. She focuses this interest more specifically on the conflicted, and conciliatory, relationship between modern science and religion in predominantly Muslim societies. She has also been looking at science education reform in diverse contexts in her research. She received her doctorate from Harvard University and did postdoctoral research on Islam, science, culture, and education at McGill University.

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One of the gAbouheifreatest discoveries in biology over the last decade is that all animals use the same genes to control the development of their body plan. If all animals share the same genes then how have the diverse body plans, from jelly fishes to humans, evolved?
Dr. Abouheif is an evolutionary developmental biologist who has tried to answer this fundamental question by using ants as a model system in his lab for almost 15 years now. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at McGill University. Ehab is the first Canada Research Chair in Evolutionary Developmental Biology in Canada, and in 2006 became an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow for his interdisciplinary approach to Evolutionary and Developmental Biology.” He received the Steacie Award, Canada’s highest honor for a young Canadian scientist, in 2014.

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